New Horses Are Rollercoasters

I got a bit off track this month for blogging…not for lack of content, but more getting sidetracked and before I knew it, it’s the end of September.

We’re two+ months into things with Liberty, and after the one-month honeymoon, the hamster started falling out of the wheel a little bit, and we’ve definitely moved into the period of ups and down and the testing phase.

I’ve had her out on trail twice and she’s been brilliant. She’s bold, brave, forward, thinks before she spooks (if she even bothers to spook…she’s much more inclined to stop, think, process, then move on) and seems to love being out on trail. The arena, not so much. We’ve also got a major hiccup in our trailer-loading abilities. So more of this month has been spent on ground work and arena work versus trail work. I’m not concerned about that part, I already know she’s a good trail horse, and conditioning miles are all she needs out there. But I want her solid and reliable and cooperative on the ground and in the arena as well.

We’re also doing little things like working on polite syringe protocol. She’s another one that hates being syringed, but she’s a heck of a lot harder to wrestle with than the 13.3hh pony (who pretty much just protests for form these days), with a nasty habit of slinging her head around and bashing it into whatever happens to be in her way.

So we’re going back to square one, starting with syringing yummy things like date syrup or molasses from a syringe. I think it’s working, since I caught her making a grab for the ziploc bag I store all the syringe and electrolyte accouterments in and attempting to liberate the syringe. We’ll see if she still feels that way when I start incorporating the salty stuff, but for now, she’s happily trying to chomp the syringe in half.

I’m also addressing some of the “make sure there’s no physical issues to give rise to objectionable behavior” angles — such as, she needs her teeth done, which may be part of why she can be fussy and resistant to the bit. Given I’ve tried half a dozen bits on her, and she hasn’t seemed to love any of them (and downright hated a few of them), I’m inclined to give her the benefit of the doubt in this regard and think that this may be her way of saying “ummm, this is not comfortable.” So, teeth get done this upcoming weekend, after which time we’ll then resume re-assessing bits and hopefully moving forward with more momentum.

But even with some of the ups and downs, I feel like overall we’re still making better forward progress than steps back, so I call that a win. Although I did cancel our entry to the fun ride at Man Against Horse — I want her to be more solid with the trailer, as well as there’s some modifications I want to make to the trailer for it to be more storage-friendly/useful. In addition, I didn’t get her out nearly as much as I would have liked to (horrible air quality for several weeks, the aforementioned loading issues, picked up some extra work on weekends…so, y’know, life) so instead, we’re aiming our sites on the LD at the McDowell ride in November, and then another LD at Estrella in December.

And ultimately, at the end of the day, she still makes me smile.

Mimi got to go out a couple weeks ago, too. After Liberty’s steadfast refusal to load on day 2, I didn’t want to get into another battle with her more than i already had, so she got stuffed back into her stall, and Mimi got to go out. And she made a liar out of me — with her complete lack of enthusiasm for working in the arena, I figured she was done, and ready for total retirement. But I had committed to meeting a friend to babysit her on her new young horse, so I figured at worst case, I could hand-walk Mimi for the 5 or so miles we were planning to go. As it turns out, I think she was just bored and ring sour, because she was full of all kinds of cheer and enthusiasm (and soundness) when we hit the trail. So that’s good to know, and that means I’ll be incorporating taking her out some more as well now.

2 thoughts on “New Horses Are Rollercoasters

  1. Thanks for sharing, enjoying following you exploits.
    Just curious how, what you will be doing to prepare Liberty for camping? What worked with Mimi, if different then for Liberty.
    Thanks! Annie

    • Since Liberty has done a few rides previously, there’s not a whole lot I probably need to do in that regard — her previous owners and first trainers did a good job exposing her to camp life early on. She has been in both temporary pens as well as on a high-tie, and historically has been a pretty good camper in the past, although it’s been about 4 years since she’s been anywhere camping, so there’s a certain element of “fingers crossed” going on that she retained all that knowledge. She eats and drinks really well any time, any where, which is a huge help.

      For Mimi, she had a lot of previous experience with standing tied at the trailer thanks to our years of showing — shows were an all-day affair, and ponies would stand tied to the trailer between our blocks of classes, so she knew how to stand patiently and politely at the trailer. The exposure to all the activity at the show grounds also meant she learned very quickly to chill out at the trailer — that’s going to be something Liberty needs to work on, because she doesn’t always politely relax when she’s standing tied at the trailer (or anywhere) during the day. So I’ve been spending some good time on that — having her stand tied to the trailer or by the barn before or after we ride, just so she gets the idea of “just chill, we don’t always have to be on the go.”

Thanks for reading! Comments are always welcome!

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